Wednesday, June 24, 2015

I'm a Daughter of the South

Yep, that's me... Alabama born and bred. George Wallace was Governor or husband of the Governor and finally former Governor in all the Alabama history books I studied from in school.

I grew up in segregated grammar schools, and in my first year in junior high, the schools were suddenly not segregated. It seemed to bother the adults, but not so much the kids. We scoped each other out, then got along, then made friends, worked and played together...in the SOUTH...in ALABAMA...and all was good.

I grew up, got a job, made friends, some of whom I confide my deepest secrets to...guess what...they are Black. Does it matter? Not to me, not to them. We just call each other friend.

Am I proud of my heritage? Yes I am. I'm a daughter of the south. Growing up I was told that all my ancestors were poor and never owned slaves. I've proved that wrong since I've been doing genealogy for years. I've found a few slave owners. I've also found the poor dirt farmers that the slave owner's daughters married. The ones that went to war...under THAT flag. The ones that died and left wives and small children behind. The Stars and Bars...THAT flag. The one that is suddenly causing so much controversy. Do I apologize? No. I didn't have anything to do with it. It's history. I had no more to do with it than with Cain killing Abel.

Do I think it symbolizes slavery? I know it does to many. I've done my reading. I believe it symbolizes the Rebel in us all. I've seen a lot of misinformation, some meant to inflame. I'm not going there. I don't believe anything I have to say would change anyone's mind on the notions they already have. I'll just ask that you actually read the Emancipation Proclamation:
Library of Congress. Public Domain.


President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of Civil War. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free."

What does THAT FLAG mean to me? That I'm from the South, that I've got ancestors who died for it. I've got a little bit of Rebel in me.

Do I think it should fly over our capitol dome? No, I don't.
Do I think it should fly at Civil War memorials? Yes I do.
Do I feel that citizens of the United States should be able to fly THAT flag if they choose? Yes I do.
Do I think that all Civil War memorials should come down? I think that's ridiculous. The founding fathers owned slaves. Why would you erase history just because you don't like it?

In the news today I'm seeing news reports of defacement of memorials, calls for the Confederate Battle Flag flying high on I-65 to come down (it is on private property and flies over a Confederate Memorial Park), memorials in city parks to come down. It scares me. ISIS is doing the same thing to sites that offend them. Where will it stop?

Yes, we lost the War Between the States. We realize this. The flag remained a symbol of Southern Pride, sort of like our state motto "We Dare Defend Our Rights". Somehow the thought that this country was founded by traitors to the British flag escapes some people. I'm descended from those Rebels too.


The flag has become a symbol of hate groups, and I HATE hate groups. I HATE that that deranged guy in South Carolina was trying to start a race war, and this controversy has given him the attention he was looking for.

Do I think that everyone that owns a coffee cup, bumper sticker, or T-shirt with a Rebel flag is proclaiming they are a hater? No. If you do all I can say is well bless your heart!

I personally don't fly the battle flag. I realize some people find it offensive, and I respect that. I am shocked that now many retailers are no longer selling the Confederate battle flag. How will I decorate my ancestors's graves?




Saturday, June 6, 2015

Kicking Butt in 1789, Isaiah and Joel Jr Phillips

I discovered an interesting court case while researching Phillips in Wilkes County, Georgia. This case concerns Isaiah and Joel Phillips Jr., sons of Joel Phillips. Both were born about 1760. I found this in the Georgia Archives



According to the plaintiff, John Hardee, Isaiah and Joel Phillips Jr, "on the fifth day of December in the year of our [Lord] one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine in the county aforesaid, with force and arms, to Whit, with Swords, Staves, Gunns, knives, Clubs, fists & feet, made an assault upon your petitioner, and then and there did beat, wound and evily treat, so that his life was Greatly dispared of and other enormities then and there did, to your petitioner against the peace and dignity of the State, and against the welfare of the Inhabitance thereof, to the damage of your petitioner, five hundred pounds."

In other words, it appears Isaiah and Joel beat the stew out of John Hardee, and he was suing for five hundred pounds. Unfortunately none of the juicy details were included in the four page document.

Isaiah and Joel (or their attorney) were required to appear in court the fourth Monday in July 1790. They were charged with trespass, assault, and battery.

There appears to have been a jury trial, and the defendants were found guilty. The funny thing is, they were only required to pay 10 pounds instead of the 500 pounds that John Hardee was suing for.

I was curious as to how this would work out in today's money. I found a nice currency converter at the National Archives. It converts old money to new, at least to 2005's standard, which is close enough for me.

John Hardee sued for 500 pounds.
In 1790, £500 would have the same spending worth of 2005's £28,015.00.
A little google search and
28015 British Pound equals
42797.11 US Dollar

And the result:
In 1790, £10 would have the same spending worth of 2005's £560.30

A little googling with that result and we come up with this:

560.30 British Pound equals
855.94 US Dollar
It looks like they got off fairly easy. It is not stated if they had to pay this individually or together. Either way it's a BIG drop from what they were being sued for.

It makes you wonder what was in those court minutes, doesn't it?

Monday, May 25, 2015

Remembering Private Kenneth George Wrigley POW Sandakan North Borneo

Paybook photograph, taken on enlistment, of QX21789 Private Kenneth George Wrigley 
Copyright expired - public domain 


From Australian War Memorial: The above photo is a Queensland Australia Paybook photograph, taken on enlistment, of QX21789 Private Kenneth George Wrigley, 2/10th Ordnance Field Workshop, Australian Army Ordnance Corps. He was one of over 2000 Allied prisoners of war (POW) held in the Sandakan POW camp in north Borneo, having been transferred there from Singapore as a part of E Force. The 500 Australian and 500 British POW's who made up E Force left Changi on 28 March 1943, on board the S.S. DeKlerk arriving at Berhala Island (adjacent to Sandakan Harbour) on 15 April 1943. The POW's were held there until 5 June, when they were taken by barge to Sandakan. The next day they were transferred to the 8 Mile Camp, which was about half a mile from the B Force compound. Private Wrigley, aged 24, died as a prisoner of the Japanese on 26 February 1945. He was the son of Walter James Wrigley and Mable Elizabeth Mary Bullock Wrigley, of Murgon, Queensland. He is commemorated on the Labuan Memorial Panel 28. (Photograph copied from AWM232, items 4 and 5. Personal information from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Database.)


Kenneth was born March 23, 1920 in Murgon, Queensland, Australia. He was almost 25 when he died.

From Sandakan Death Marches Wikipedia: In 1942 and 1943, Australian and British POWs who had been captured at the Battle of Singapore in February 1942 were shipped to North Borneo to construct a military airstrip and prisoner-of-war camps at Sandakan, North Borneo (Sabah). The prisoners were forced to work at gunpoint, and were often beaten while also receiving very little food or medical attention. In August 1943, with the intention of controlling the enlisted men by removing any commanders, most officer prisoners were moved from Sandakan to the Batu Lintang camp at Kuching. Conditions for the remaining prisoners deteriorated sharply following the officers' removal. Any rations given were further reduced, and sick prisoners were also forced to work on the airstrip. After construction was completed the prisoners initially remained at the camp. In January 1945, with only 1,900 prisoners still alive, the advancing Allies managed to successfully bomb and destroy the airfield. It was at this time with Allied landings anticipated shortly that camp commandant Captain Hoshijima Susumu decided to move the remaining prisoners westward into the mountains to the town of Ranau, a distance of approximately 160 miles.


The first phase of marches across wide marshland, dense jungle, and then up the eastern slope of Mount Kinabalu occurred between January and March 1945. The Japanese had selected 470 prisoners who were thought to be fit enough to carry baggage and supplies for the accompanying Japanese battalions relocating to the western coast. In several groups the POWs, all of whom were either malnourished or suffering serious illness, started the journey originally under the intention of reaching Jesselton (Kota Kinabalu). Although the route took nine days, they were given enough rations for only four days. As on the Bataan Death March, any POWs who were not fit enough or collapsed from exhaustion were either killed or left to die en route. Upon reaching Ranau, the survivors were halted and ordered to construct a temporary camp. "Those who survived... were herded into insanitary and crowded huts to then die from dysentery. By 26 June, only five Australians and one British soldier were still alive."

Kenneth was my husband's second cousin, once removed. Rest in peace Kenneth.

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Meggs to Meigs and Back Again-Same but Different #52Ancestors

Wikipedia, public domain, Snowflakes

I recently had a fourth cousin once removed contact me through my blog. I was glad to meet my cousin Wendell Meggs. He is 91 years young, and he allowed me to share this story:

     That "second name change", as I call it - after Vincent or John first changed from Meggs to Meigs back in about 1644, when they moved from Mass. to CT.
     My Grandfather, James Anderson Meggs, 1872, told me this story:  Stephen C Meggs, (great grandson of John T)  born 1868 in Bibb Co., AL, left to go to medical school when he was old enough. He did become a DR. While away he met some people whose name sounded like his surname, only they spelled it Meigs. He became convinced that the original spelling was Meigs. When he got back to AL from his studies, he began persuading as many as possible to change the spelling of their surname from Meggs to Meigs.
     My Grandfather was the first born in the family of Stephen Strider Meggs in Sep. 1872. After Dr. Stephen began his effort to change names, my great grandfather Stephen S Meggs b 1846, did change to Meigs. 8 of his 12 children changed as well. My grandfather and 3 other siblings did not change. I met my grandfather's brother Walter one time in the 1960s and he was a Meigs.
     James Elijah Meggs, who wrote the book about the descendants of John T, said that the name was always spelled MEGGS in England, which, of course, is the origin of our name.
    I'm glad to share that story. In the time that I knew him, starting in 1925 when he and the remaining family moved to Nashville, where we were living at that time, he was always a stubborn man, and my Dad and a couple of his brothers were just as stubborn. So it is no wonder to me that he refused to change the spelling of his name.
     Certainly you may use that story on your blog. As you, no doubt know, some of the websites don't like to use undocumented stories as part of their records.
     That story about the name change has a bearing on John T as well. He started life as a Meggs, but then long after he was dead some began to use the Meigs for his name. That plus the fact that so many say that John T's father was Stephen Strider Meigs (Jr), who was in the French and Indian War (1756-1763) and may well have been in the Northwest corner of Virginia, where there was fierce fighting during the period of John T's birth.
     If you find any other information about John T, I would really like to hear it. I am hoping I can the complete story about John T and Polly before I get completely unable to keep searching.

Best regards, Wendell Meggs

My reply:
Hi Wendell,
I'll be more than happy to share any stories you would like to tell...
I think it's important to record them. Unless you've written a book, you may be the only one that would know them.
I consider it to be documented as long as I can document where I got the story :--)

I, like Wendell, would love to hear any info you have on John T Meggs and family. Hopefully Wendell has more stories he would like to tell.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Sergeant Caleb Rogers Warnick CSA of Alabama 1829-1917

Caleb Rogers Warnick was born January 15, 1829 in Blount County, Alabama. He was the oldest child of Robert W. and Malinda Cheney Warnick.

The 1830 Blount County, Alabama census shows Robert W Warnick as head of household. 1 male under 5, 1 male 20-30, 1 female under 5, 1 female 20-30.

The 1840 Blount County census shows
Robert Warnock head of household
1 M under 5 (Henry 1840)
3 M 5 – 9 (John 1831, Caleb 1829, Unknown)
1 M 30 – 39 (Robert)
1 F under 5 (Mary 1838)
1 F 10 – 15 (Delila 1829)
1 F 30 – 39 (Melinda)

1850 17th Subdivision Blount County, Alabama
Wornack R.W. 45 M Farmer Ga. Can't read and write
Wornack Delila 21 F Ala. Can't read and write
Wornack Caleb 16 M Farmer Ala.
Wornack Mary 12 F Ala.
Wornack Henry 10 M Ala.
Wornack Andrew 8 M Ala.
Wornack Rebecca 6 F Ala.

Caleb married Sophronia Holley July 27, 1854 in Blount County, Alabama.




They were the parents of at least ten children:
George Washington born 1855, married Flora Jane Cargo
Margaret "Maggie" born 1858, married Charles Scott Mann
James P born 1859, married Manerva Jane Marsh
H A (male) born 1862
Nancy born 1866
Mary C born 1869, married John William Brown
John Wesley "West" born 1874, married Constance Belma "Connie" Freeman
Gibbie Catherine born 1878, married Preston Lewis Ethridge
Gus born 1881, married Nellie Gray
Richard, birth unknown, died before 1892, married Molly Honeycut

1860 Western Division Blount, Alabama
WORNICK CALEB 27 M W AL Farm Laborer, Personal Property 1300, can not read and write
Sophona, 22, AL, can not read and write
George W, 5, AL
Margaret, 3, AL
James P, 1



Caleb enlisted in Blountsville, Blount, Alabama as a Sergeant May 14, 1862 in Morgan's Kentucky Cavalry, Company G, of the 2nd Kentucky Regiment (Colonel Duke's Regiment), under Capt. McFarland, commanded by John H. Morgan, C.S.A. Even though this was a Kentucky regiment, 64 of its members were recruited in Blountsville, Alabama. You can find info on Morgan's Raiders and the Lexington Rifles with a google search. I have included a few links at the end of this blog for further reading if you are interested. They were active in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio. One fact I found interesting, they became the Confederate force that penetrated the farthest north into Union territory during the Civil War.

Caleb was wounded in the battle of Bacon Creek, Kentucky. He was captured at Buffington Island, Ohio July 19, 1863, and sent to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Indiana July 23, 1863. He was sent to Camp Douglas, Illinois August 18, 1863. He was transferred to Point Lookout, Maryland for exchange February 21, 1865. He was discharged March 18, 1865.

CSA prisoners at Camp Douglas in August 1863 shows Caleb Warnick Pvt. G Co. 2nd Kentucky Cavalry captured 19 Jul 1863 at Buffington Island. Third entry #304. Image provided by Kevin Dwyer

1870 Blountsville, Blount County, Alabama

Womack, C R, 36, Farmer, Real Estate 100, Personal 200 (Caleb R)
Womack, J S, 33, F, Keeping house (Sophronia J)
Womack, G W, 14, M, Attended School (George W)
Womack, W A, 13, F, Attended School (Margaret)
Womack, J P, 11, M, Attended School (James P)
Womack, West, 8, M, Attended School (John Wesley)
Womack, Nancy, 4, F
Womack, M C, 1, F (Mary C)

December 24, 1872, Caleb purchased land in Blount county.


1880 I have not been able to locate Caleb, and of course the 1890 census was destroyed. This is a big gap that I've not been able to fill.

On February 18, 1892 Caleb agreed that custody of his grandson, Edward Warnick, would be given to John W Brown. John was the husband of Caleb's daughter Mary C. Warnick. Edward's mother was Molly Honeycut.

State of Alabama
Jefferson County

This agreement made and entered into this 18th day of Feby. 1892, by and between C. R. Warnick and Molly Warnick witnesseth: that they both agree & consent that the Habeas Corpus proceeding against C. R. Warnick inslithled {instigated?} by Molly Warnick for the recovery of her child Edward, shall be dismissed, and that Jno. W. Brown, the Uncle of the child Edward shall take possession of the child & act as it's guardian & custodian for the purpose of protection & raising it and shall act as it's lawful guardian.
Witness our hands & seals this 18th day of Feby. 1892
Attest:
J. W. Russell
Jno. McQueen
Molie Warnick
C. R. Warnick

per J R Warnick

Caleb's wife Sophronia died January 5, 1898 and was buried in Dolomite, Jefferson, Alabama at Bethlehem Methodist Church Cemetery.

1900 finds Caleb in Jefferson County, Alabama, Precinct 7. This would be around present day Hueytown. He is living with his son John and his family.
Warnick, John W, Mar 1875, 25, married 1 year, self and parents born AL, coal miner
Connie B, wife, Aug 1881, 18, married 1 year, 0 children, 0 living, born AL, father SC, mother GA
Caleb, ?relationship, Jan 1831, 69, widowed, born AL, father TN, mother VA, farmer
Ida A, grandaughter (of Caleb), born Apr 1878, 22, single, self and parents AL, no occupation

Caleb filed for his Confederate pension in 1910 at the age of 80. He was granted pension number 3561.



In 1910, Caleb is still living in Precinct 7, but now with his daughter Gibby and her family. There is a big ink blot or hole in part of the family. Ida is still with Caleb. I believe she must have helped care for Caleb.
Ethridge, Preston L 37 M W AL Occupation Foreman, mines coal, self and parents born AL
????, wife, 31, married 13 years, 1 child, 1 living, self and parents born AL (Gibbie)
???dine, daughter, 11, born AL (Claudine)
Warnick, Calob R, Father-in-law, 80, born AL, Father born TN, Mother born VA
Warnick, Ida R, sister-in-law, 32, single, self and parents AL
Gamble, Jodie, boarder, F, B, 47, Widowed, 7 children, 6 living, self and parents born GA, servant, private home
Gamble, Rosett, boarder, F, B, 10, self and parents born GA

Caleb died September 14, 1917 in Rutledge Springs (present day Fairfield Highlands).
Here is the obit.
The Birmingham Age-Herald
Friday, September 14, 1917
News of Ensley


C.R. Warnick, a pioneer citizen of Jefferson county, died Friday morning at 1 o'clock at the home of his son, J. W. Warnick, at Rutledge Springs. Mr. Warnick had been ill with pneumonia for only a week. He was 88 years of age. Surviving him are four sons; G. W. Warnick of Boaz, J. P. Warnick of Marvel, J. W. Warnick of Rutledge Springs, and Gus Warnick of Piper; two daughters Mrs. C. W. Mann of Amory, Miss., and Mrs. P. L. Etheridge of Central Park. The funeral will take place at Bethlehem church this morning at 11 o'clock with Echols and Angwine in charge, interment following at the same place.




More on Morgan's Raiders
http://www.indystar.com/article/99999999/NEWS06/101218017
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hunt_Morgan
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morgan%27s_Raid
http://www.connerprairie.org/Places-To-Explore/1863-Civil-War-Journey/Learn-more-about-the-Civil-War/General-Morgan-s-Raid-on-Indiana
http://www.lexingtonrifles.com/hdqtrs.htm
http://www.bchist.com/Bacon_Creek_durring_the_Civil_War.html

Sunday, March 15, 2015

DNA and Dumplings

Am I Irish? AncestryDNA says I am 31%, although I suspect some of that Western Europe may be a bit of Irish too.


Some of my known Irish ancestors from my paternal side are:

James McGowan born 1833. He immigrated to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania July 18, 1850 aboard the Barque Creole, and settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He died there March 18, 1889.

Bridget Conlon born May 18, 1837. Her parents were Michael and Ellen per her death certificate. On the 1900 census, she states she immigrated in 1855. She married James McGowan. After his death she moved to Birmingham, Alabama with her son Patrick.

Archibald McKenzie christened October 11, 1818 in Macroom, Cork, Ireland. He was the son of Murdock and Sarah McKenzie. He immigrated about 1863 and settled in Beaver Falls, Beaver, Pennsylvania.

Jane McKenzie born on Saint Patrick's Day, March 17, 1842, probably in Macroom, Cork. She was the daughter of Archibald McKenzie and Elizabeth Brown. She immigrated to New York June 23, 1864 on the Ship Marianne Nottebohm.

Daniel McNamara born March, 1841, possibly in Cork. He immigrated to New York December 28, 1863 aboard the ship Universe. He married Jane McKenzie and settled in Universal, Pennsylvania. Their daughter Lizzie married Patrick McGowan.

My maternal side also has Irish surnames, but they have all been in the US much longer than my paternal side. I have not been able to trace most of them back to Ireland yet. Some of those are:

William McCullough born 1793 in South Carolina.

Daniel Gibson born about 1680 in Augusta, Virginia.

Samuel Cargo born about 1745 in Augusta, Virginia.

James McDole or McDowell was born in Ireland about 1745 and died November 6, 1840 in Laurens, South Carolina.

I also have the Warnick surname on my maternal line. I haven't been able to determine for certain if it's an Irish or German line. Warnock is Irish, and Warnecke is German. Online trees have my Warnick line connected to Ireland, but I'm not entirely sure that's correct. There are some gaps in the paper trail. Oral history of this family line says they are German. Hopefully DNA will provide further clues....and then there are the chicken and dumplings. My mom's recipe handed down from the women in her family were the German style, made like fist sized simmered biscuits, and not the rolled out noodle style.. maybe there's a clue in that?

I'd love to hear the origins of dumplings in your family...which type and family origins.



Saturday, February 28, 2015

Slaves Found in My Family History Research

Schalene Dagutis had a great idea in coming up with the Slave Name Roll Project. The idea is to post the names of slaves found in your family history research to help those looking for their slave ancestors. I will be adding to this post as I discover others.
James Hopkinson's Plantation. Planting sweet potatoes. ca. 1862/63 Henry P. Moore - Library of Congress
Slaves of William Cornelius (from his will, Blount, Alabama 1840)
I give and have given to my eldest daughter Amy Cargill, the wife of Cornelius Cargill, one Negro girl named Charlotte and her child Lucy.

I give and have given to my eldest son Jesse Cornelius, on Negro boy named Isaiah.

I have given to my son Aaron Cornelius one Negro girl named Leah and her two children, one girl named Harlot, {Hariot or Harriett?} and one boy named Lewis.

I give and have given to my son William Cornelius two Negro boys (brothers), one named Jacob in his possession and the other named Andrew.

I have given to my son Champion Cornelius one Negro girl named Ann and her two children, one named Ransom and the other name Metilda. {Matilda}

I have given to my son Beverly Cornelius two Negro girls, one named Ester {Esther} and the other named Tener.

I have given to my daughter Lettice Cooks children, on Negro girl named Marah.

I have given to my daughter Tabitha Hays one Negro girls named Elinar. {Eleanor}

I have given and bequeath to my son Abner Cornelius on Negro boy named Stuard. {Stewart Steward}

Slaves of Augustus Wheat  (Atlanta, DeKalb County, Campbellton, Campbell County, Douglas County Georgia)

1850, Atlanta, DeKalb, Georgia
22 year old female

1860 Campbellton, Campbell, Georgia
a 45 year old female and two children, both 7 years old, male and female

Indentured former slave children
1866 Campbellton, Campbell, Georgia

Thompson Wheat* boy twelve years old, Mary Wheat a girl seven years old, Edwin Wheat** a boy five years old and Nancy Wheat*** a girl three years old.
*Married 30 Sep 1873 Campbell, Georgia to Elizzie Smith
** born August 1859, died 7 August 1921. Married Laura Ellison 23 December 1888 in Douglas, Georgia..

April 1867
Augustus Wheat 15 years old

22 June 1867
Robert Edmondson 16 years old

1880 GA Douglas Co., District 1273,Roll T9_144; FHF 1254144, Pg 185.1000, ED50, dwell 127, lines 12-16, June ??
Wheate, Mary 56, widow, white, GA, GA, GA, keeping house, can read & write
Wheate, Gilbert, son, 18, white, GA, GA, GA, farm labor, can read & write
Wheate, Alzira, dau., 14, white, GA, GA, GA, at home, can read & write
Wheate, Ed, son**,18, black, GA, GA, GA, farm labor, cannot read or write
Wheate, Nancy, dau.***, 15, black, GA, GA, GA, farm labor, cannot read or write

Slaves of Moses Kirkland (will dated March 7, 1847, Henry County, Alabama)
...unto my daughter Ailcey Bracken, a negro boy named Abram, also a negro girl named Eveline...said negroes are now in her possession... her husband Mathew Brackin.
...unto my daughter Ruth Kirkland, two negroes, a girl named Hannah and a boy named Alex already in her possession...her said husband William S. Kirkland.
...unto my son, Benjamin Kirkland a negro boy named Alford and one named Service already in his possession.
...unto my son Willis Kirkland, a negro boy named Green and one named Jacob already in his possession.
...unto my son Josiah Kirkland one negro boy named Melvin and one named Daniel already in his possession.

Slaves of William Crabtree (will dated November 4, 1747, Baltimore, Maryland)
...unto my loving wife Jane Crabtree one Irish servant lad called Alexander Anderson, during her widowhood, then to go to my son William Crabtree.
...to my son Thomas Crabtree one servant man that Samuel Webb owes me...
...to my son John Crabtree one Negro boy called Duke...

Slaves of James Warnock (will dated January 16, 1804,  Wilson County, Tennessee)
...to my beloved wife Rhoda a negro wench named Rachel so long as she lives on said land but if she moves of sd land then said wench to return to my proper heirs and if sd wench should have any more children during the time that she has he in possession, such child or children shall be taken away at eighteen months old...
... to my daughter Ann a negro boy named Abram...
...to my daughter Elenor a negro boy named Lige...

Slaves of Robert Dowdle, Sr (will dated September 2, 1819,  Anderson, Anderson, South Carolina)
...unto my Beloved wife Mary...My Negro wench Sally to her...together with my Negro fellow Maurice... My Negro wench Betty to be under the care of my said wife during her life and at her Death to be provided for by my Son Samuel and his heirs. It is further my will that at the Death of my said wife, the aforementioned Negro Fellow Maurice be manumitted from Servitude for Life.
...give and bequeath to my Son Samuel, at the death of my wife Mary, the Negro boy, by name Nathan and at the Death of my Son, this Boy to be left to my Son Samuells Son James...Also I give and bequeath to my Son Samuel the Negro Girl Lucy and her Increase to him, his heirs and assigns forever.
I give and bequeath to my Grand Son Robert Barr, son of my Son Samuel, a Negro Boy by name Cato...
I will and bequeath to my Son James, his heirs and assigns, the Negro Fellow by name Tom.
To my Daughter Margaret Pickens a Negro Boy by name Sambo.
Also to my Son John Dowdle a Negro girl by name Susan with her Increase.

Slaves of Eli Wheat (will dated December 13, 1809, Columbia County, Georgia)

...one negro man named Will, one other negro man named Hannibel, also one negro woman named Polley and her Child called Presby and their increase... I will to my Father and Mother, during their natural lives - but when my Father dies my will then is that the negro man Will as above named may go to my Brother Wesley Wheat...

...after the death of my Father and Mother, the negros Hanibel, Polley and Presby and their increase if any may go to my Brother Harvey Wheat...


Slaves of William H Richardson (Inventory December 23, 1864, Greene County, Alabama)



Ransom
King
Lucinda
Charles
Lucy
Kitty
Jack
Fanny

Sale from Isaiah Phillips to Joel Phillips, Sr December 12, 1791 Wilkes, Georgia

12 Dec 1791 Bill of Sale for a negro wench named Bett, about 21 years old, and a child named Rose, 3 years old. From Isaiah Phillips to Joel Phillips, Senr, for £75. Proved by William Ramey who saw Isaiah Phillips, son of Joel Phillips, sign bill of sale. Recorded 16 Apr 1792 in Wilkes Co Deed Book GG, Page 456

If you have any additional information on anyone listed here, I will be happy to add it.

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

New Year's Baby Joseph Norman 1955-1987 #52Ancestors #52

Joseph Wilburn Norman was the New Year's Baby in Birmingham, Alabama in 1955. He was the son of John and Dorothy Phillips Norman.


Dorothy almost named him Samuel, but as soon as she found out he was the New Year's Baby, she instantly knew she would name him Joseph.

Joseph was welcomed at home by his older brother, John David. They were inseparable.
Joe was raised in a super clean environment. This was in the 50's when everything was boiled, bleached, or Lysoled. (Much unlike my own home). The first time he was ever put on the floor, he got up and walked.

Joe made up for lost time out in the woods and fields. The two boys were always into something. During the summer they would come in so dirty, Dorothy would have them strip at the back door and wash off with the hosepipe (yeah, this is Alabama, it's a hosepipe).

Joe was once building a treehouse and he managed to hang himself with a rope. David and Dorothy were working in the garden nearby. Dorothy happened to see him hanging and cleared a fence by putting one hand on a post and leaping over, and was able to rescue Joe before it was too late.

When Joe was small, about 1 1/2, he was hospitalized to have his tonsils taken out. David had sympathy pains and laid in bed until his brother came home.

Joe was a prankster and absolutely LOVED firecrackers...maybe it had something to do with being the "New Year's Baby".


Joe was married twice, first to Robin. They divorced after a year.
Joe married Sheree and they had two children, Joey and Melanie. (I'm not using last names here since all parties are still living).


Joe worked in the oil fields, mainly around Zachary, Louisiana.

Sheree and Joe eventually broke up. Joe fully embraced the bachelor life. He liked to party, to put it mildly.

Joe died December 29, 1987 on Interstate 65 in Evergreen, Alabama. He and a friend were on the way to Florida. It was a spur of the minute trip, and both were roaring drunk. Joe was thrown from the car, and died instantly. His friend survived.

Joe had always told us he wanted to donate his body to science, so that's what happened. We donated his body to University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Joe has a marker next to his mother in the Phillips Cemetery, Little River, Baldwin, Alabama.
Rest In Peace Joe.

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

One of the Nuts-William McCullough 1793-1863 #52Ancestors #51



William McCullough, my 3rd great grandfather, was born about 1793 in South Carolina. He married Eleanor, probably in 1814 in South Carolina. They both would have been about 21.
While in South Carolina, they had:
William Madison born 1815 in SC. He married Chloe McCraw.
The family moved to Warren County, Tennessee, where the following children were born:
Gabriel J. born about 1817. He married Mary Meggs. (My 2nd great grandparents)
Martha Jane born Nov 21, 1817. She married Lemuel McCraw.
James born about 1820. He married Sarah Haggard.
The family moved to Perry County, Alabama where the following children were born:
Elizabeth born 1827. She married William S England.
Rufus born 1832. He married Cynthia Thompson.
Thomas Huntington McCullough born August 15, 1835. He married Louisa Smith.

William is mentioned in one of the "Three Brothers Stories". You know the ones...there were three brothers that came to the US...
This one was found on the McCullough Ancestry message board:
"They was three McCullough brothers born in the 1760's that came from Ireland with their parents and they were on the 1790 census in Pendleton District South Carolina with their mother their father was probably already dead. Their names were John, James, and William McCullough. James and William died in 1819 and John died in 1833. the grant they got in 1790 was put in John's name and when he died it had to be divided up. James and Williams families sold their part and moved to Alabama and Florida. William had three sons that went to Alabama. William Culpepper McCollough born 1799, John Reed McCollough born 1802, and Thomas McCollough born 1804. My DNA matched all these decendents and I go back to John. The William McCullough born 1793 could have been James son. I know he had one born 1794."

There was no shortage of McCulloughs in the 1790 census in Pendleton District South Carolina. The numbers following the names are page numbers.
McCullouch, Samuel 100
McCullock, Rob 16
McCullock, Rob 25
McCullock, Sam 16
McCullock, Wm 16
McCulloh, Wm 93
McCullough, Andw 11
McCullough, Elizabeth 52
McCullough, Hugh 52
McCullough, James 51
McCullough, James 57
McCullough, James 61
McCullough, John 52
McCullough, John 52
McCullough, Jno 58
McCullough, Thos 16
McCullough, Wm 51
McCullum, Hansel 101

McCullum, James 39

In the 1830 Perry, Alabama census, William is enumerated with a household of 7 males, 3 females, and 0 slaves. There is also a David McCullough with 1 male, 1 female, and 4 slaves. Too bad the 1830 census did not give ages. Possible father or other relative??

In 1836 William purchased land in Perry County:
SW quarter of SW quarter 40 acres William McCullough Aug 20 1836 #30923
SE quarter of SW quarter 80 acres William McCullough Aug 20 1836 #30923

1840 Perry, Alabama:

Wm McCullough
1 male under 5
1 male 5-10
2 males 15-20
1 mae 20-30
1 male 40-50
1 female 10-15
1 female 20-30

1 female 40-50

1850 Severe, Perry, Alabama
Wm McCullough 49 Farmer 200 SC
Elender 47 SC
Thomas H 15 AL
Gabriel J 26 TN

Rufus G 18 AL

In 1852 William, along with his son William M, signed a bond as administrator of Morris Moon's estate in Perry County.


1860 Oak Grove, Perry, Alabama
Wm McCullough, 67, SC, Insane
Ellenor McCullough, 67, wife. SC

William's son William M McCullough was appointed guardian of person and estate of William M McCullough, lunatic, 17 March 1863. It's more than probable that William suffered from
Alzheimer's due to the fact he was not insane before the 1860 census.
I've got a copy of the above, but have evidently misfiled it. I'll add as soon as I locate it...

Some questions remain:
Where in South Carolina did William McCullough come from?
Who are his parents?
Who is his wife Eleanor?

When and where did they marry?
When did he die and where was he buried?
This work has been released into the public domain by its author, Natrajdr at the wikipedia project

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Abraham Goad 1665-1734 #52Ancestors #50

Abraham Goad was born before or about 1665 in Lancaster County, Virginia. He was thoughtful enough to leave lots of records behind.

Abraham married Katherine Williams, daughter of John Williams and his wife Eve. Abraham was a tobacco planter in Richmond County, Virginia.
Abraham and Katherine had seven children:
William born 1693, married Mary
Hannah born 1695, married Tobias Phillips and William Dodson
John born 1700, married Katherine Jennings and Ann Isham?
Alice born 1704, married Fortunatus Dodson and John Fowler
Elizabeth born 1705 married John Dodson
Abraham born 1709, married Joanna Wheatley
Peter born 1715, never married

Abraham was the great grandfather of John Sevier, the first governor of Tennessee.

Abraham left several court records behind, although his last name was usually spelled Goard. There are records going back to 1652 but I believe that would be another Abraham Goad (father??)

9th of November, 1687 - The County of Lancaster being indebted in the quantity of foure thousand three hundred twenty and nine pounds of tobacco and caske, have ordered a Levie of seven pounds of tobacco bee raised by Capt. Richard Neusum, High Sheriffe of this County, off and from every Tithable person in this County...(including) ABRAHAM GOARD 01 ( a tithe of 1 lb of Tobacco)

14 of December, 1687 - p 66 - at the Courthouse of Lancaster County December the 14, 1687 May it please your excellencty - In Obedience to your Excellencys directed to this Court for the returneing an Accompt of all persons that are able to beare Armes both for Horse and Foot Service in this County, wee have duely examined a List of the Freeholders and House Keepers inhabiting in ore said County and wee doe finde upon ore inquiry that many of them are very poore, despicable persons. Wee have returned yore Excellency the full exprest by yore Order as Followeth:
Persons appointed for Foot Service - 101 individuals, (including): ABRA: GOARD.

Lancaster County Will Order Abstracts 27th of November 1680 - pp72 - 73
An inventory of the Estate of Robert Brian (deceased)...including: An accot. of tobacco due to the Estate:
Three hogshds of old tobacco in the House weighing 1390; One Bill of Richd. Marshall, a Bill of Jno Nerings, a Bill of ABRAHAM GOARDS, a Bill of Jno Frondes,....

Will of John Phillips of Lancaster County, VA, Jan 30, 1689-90,
Witnessed by ABRAHAM GOARD

DEED between Wm. Smyth (Katherine William's stepfather) and ABRAHAM GOARD - March 24, 1699

THIS INDENTURE made the 24th day of March in the yeare of our Lord according to the computacon of the Church of England 1699 Between Wm Smyth of the Parish of North Farnham & County of Richmond, Carpenter, of the one part and ABRAHAM GOARD of the Parish & County aforesaid also Plantr. of the other part. Witnesseth that the said William Smyth for Six thousand pounds of tobacco good & merchantable in caske to be paid hath granted unto the said ABRAHAM GOARD his heirs & assignes forever one parcell of Land conteyning One hundred & fifty acres or thereabouts be it more or less, one part of wch: the houses & plantacon of the said Wm. Smyth & now in the occupation & holding of the said ABRAHAM GOARD, being prt of a greater devident conteyning Foure hundred ninty & eight acres belonging to the said Wm. Smyth, scituate lying & being on the North side of Rappahannock River and on the branches of Farnham & Morattico Creeks beginning at a marked Poplar standing in the mouth of a forke or branch that issues out of the Bryery Swamp and running alongs a line of marked tress to Dacres, his path, thence alonge the meanders of the said path to the line of the said William Smyth bearing Easterly, thence alonge the said line to the Poplar, the first station, And likewise all houses buildings in upon or about the said One hundred & fifty acres of land or thereabouts with the profitts belonging, And also all right of the said William Smyth to the said Land, To have & tohold to the only proper use of him the said ABRAHAM GOARD his heirs & assignes forever, fully discharged from all manner of formes & titles comitted by the said Wm. Smyth his heirs, the Quitrents hereof only excepted to be paid unto the Chief Lords or Proprietors of the Fees by the said ABRAHAM GOARD his heirs or assignes, And the said Wm. Smyth doth agree for himselfe his heirs warrant & forever defend against the claimes of any persons
whatsoever so that the said ABRAHAM GOARD his heirs may hold the before granted premisses and the profitts of the same to take without the hinderance of said Wm. Smyth his heirs or any other persons clayming the same. In Witness whereof I have sett my hand
& seale Sealed & detivent in presence of us:
William Smyth, his marke, Richard Samphee, his marke, Thoe Hughes, his mark, Edward Jones


KNOW ALL MEN by these presents that I Eve Smyth (Abraham's mother-in-law), the Wife of William Smyth of the Parish of North Farnham and County of Richmond, Carpenter, have nominated & constituted Samuel Sammford my true & lawfull Attorney to appeare afore the Worshipll Court of Richmond & acknowledge my full assent & consent to the passing away all my right & interest of Dower unto certaine Lands sold unto ABRAHAM GOARD & by a certaine Indenture bearing date with these presens and therefore I do hereby release & forever quit claims all my right of Dower to the said Lands & every part thereof. As witness
my hand and seal this 24th of March Ano: Dom: 1699 in presence of us Richd Sampee his marke; Eve Smyth, her marke; Tho Hughes, his marke;
Edward Jones ; Recordr: Test Wm. Colston, Cl Cur
Memoran: The (blank) day of March 1699 the within named William Smyth entered into the Capitall messuage & tooke possession thereof & also tooke turff & twigg on the land within granted & then peacably after delivered possession & seisin thereby of all& singular the plantacon lands houses & premisses within mentioned according to the tenour of this present Deed of Grant & Sale unto the within named ABRAHAM GOARD.

Richmond County Orders 1697-1699, P. 402
Richmond County Court 7th of June 1699
Phillip Keph, Servant to ABRAHAM GOARD, being presented to this Court to have inspection in his age is adjudged Twelve years old and ordered to serve his said Master or his assigns according to Act
John Wallis, Servant to ABRAHAM GOARD, being presented to this Court to have inspection into his age is adjudged Twelve years old and ordered to serve his said Master or his assigns according to Act

Abraham died April 11, 1733 after having written his will in March. In the will his name is spelled Goad. Of course...my ancestor Alice got one shilling...

 In the name of God Amen. I Abraham GOAD being weak of body but in sound and perfect mind and memory thanks be given to all mighty God for the same, do make and ordain this to be my last will and testement, but first of all I recommend my soul to the hands of Almighty God that gave it to me & my body to be buryed in a Christianlike manner at the discretion of my Executors hereafter mentioned, and as touching my temporal Estate in which it has pleased Almighty God to bless me with, I give and dispose of the same in manner and form following:
 Imprimus - I give and bequeath to my grandson, William Goad, son of William Goad, that plantation whereon Mary Goad now lives and all the land thereto belonging on that side of the swamp up to Mr. Griffin's line (excepting a small piece of land I have given bond to Mr. William Downman for the acknowledgement of).
 Item - I give and bequeath to my son, John Goad, and his wife all land that lies above the North Fork of briary swamp belongs to me up to Oakley's line....
 Item - I give to my son, Abraham Goad, all the land lying on the south side of my spring branch.... in case the said Abraham should die without heirs, then the said land to fall to my son Peter.....
 Item - I give unto my son, Peter Goad, all the land lying on the north side of my spring branch......
 Item - I give to the heirs of my son, William Goad, dec'd, one shilling to be paid by...
 Item - I give to my daughter, Hannah Phillips, one shilling.....
 Item - I give to my daughter, Elizabeth Dodson, one shilling.....
 Item - I give to my daughter, Alice Dodson, one shilling.....
 Item - I give and bequeath to my wife, Catherine, the use of my Negro woman, Judith, and all the remaining part of my personal Estate during her natural life & after her decease to be equally divided amongst my three sons John Goad, Abraham Goad, and Peter Goad. My will and desire is that my wife Catherine Goad live on my plantation and not be molested during her natural life.
 Item - I likewise constitute ordain and appoint my son John Goad to be the whole and sole Executor of this my last will and testament, as witness my hand and seal this 7th day of March, 1733.


. Witnesses: Eliza E. Lawson                                      his
                    Winefed Miskell                     Abraham  AG  Goad
                    Henry Miskell                                         mark


1733, 1 Jul: Richmond Co Will Bk V, p 238 (dated 7 Mar 1733): will was proven. Inventory on page 240. Probate: July 01, 1734, North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co., Virginia.


If you are related to this family, I'd love to hear from you.

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Fortunatus Dodson 1700-1737 #52Ancestors #49

Fortunatus Dodson was born about 1700 in Richmond County, Virginia. He was the son of Charles Dodson and his wife Ann Stone.

Fortunatus was bequeathed property in his father's will "son Fortunatas all land below my spring branch". The will was probated May 2, 1716.

You would think Fortunatus Dodson would be an unusual name, but there are several land records for Fortunatus Dodson that go back to the 1600's in Richmond, Virginia. I'm not going to include those here as they belong to one of the other Fortunatus Dodsons that were in the same area. There were at least four by the name in the area in the 1700s.

Fortunatus married Alice Goad September 9, 1726 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia. Alice was the daughter of Abraham and Katherine Williams Goad.
North Farnham Episcopal Church from Library of Congress

Fortunatus and Alice had the following children, all born in North Farnham Parish:
Lucy born 1728
James born 1730
Ann born 1732
Alice born 1733
Samuel
Hannah born 1737

Fortunatus died on September 9, 1737 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia. He did not leave a will. His widow Alice then married John Fowler and had several more children.

Saturday, December 6, 2014

Milly Mills Yielding 1768-1811 #52Ancestors #48

Milly Mills was the daughter of William Mills and his wife Eleanor Nelly Morris. I can finally say that with some confidence. DNA has proven the connection back to Milly's father and grandfather. Milly was born 1768 in North Carolina.
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s official duties under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code

The only thing I had as far as evidence before the DNA match was an indenture (land sale) between Milly's husband,  Richard Yielding, and her father William Mills.

Milly Mills married Richard "Yealding" in Rutherford,North Carolina on November 5, 1788. They had ten children:
Devinea born November 20, 1790 married William Sanders.
Francis born December 21, 1792 married Elizabeth Earles.
Richard J. born March 17, 1795 married Agnes Unknown and Mariah Wilds.
John Jasper born February 14, 1797 married Nancy Billingsley.
Rachel born 1799.
Elizabeth born July 24, 1801 married Robert Christopher Freeman.
Leticia "Littie" born 1802 married Andrew Allred.
Joseph born August 17, 1804 married Mary McCutcheon and Chasey M. Bartlett.
Taylor Mills Loftin born February 2, 1809 married Susannah Permelia Miller.
Dorcas born 1810 married Thomas Francis Calaway Waid.

The above mentioned land sale
INDENTURE BETWEEN WILLIAM MILLS AND RICHARD YIELDING

No. 1374 March the 25th 1793

This Indenture made this eleventh day of Juary in the year of our Lord one
thousand seven hundred and ninety three Between William Mills of the county
of Rutherford and state of North Carolina of the one part; and Richard
Yielding of the county and state aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth;
that for and in consideration of the sum of thirty pounds good and lawful
money of the State aforesaid to him the
said William Mills in hand paid by the said Richard Yielding and before the
sealing of these presents the receipt and payment whereof I do hereby
acknowledge hath granted bargained sold allienated [sic] Enfeofed [sic]
conveyed and confirmed and by these presents doth grant bargain sell allien
Enfeof [sic] convey and confirm unto the said Richard Yielding his heirs and
assigns forever one certain piece or parcel of land containing by estimation
one hundred acres granted by his Excellency Alexander
Martin Captain General Commander of the State of aforesaid in the year of our
Lord 1790 and 16th day of November lying and being in County and State
aforesaid on both sides of Rollen (this word is spelled Rotten in some
abstracts - I do not see the "Ls" crossed) Creek of Green River Begining
[sic] at a red oak on the South side of the creek thence North one hundred
poles to a Spanish oak then west one hundred and sixty poles to a stake
thence south one hundred poles to a stake thence to the begining [sic]
containing one hundred acres with the appurtainances [sic] situate lying and
being as aforesaid to have and to hold all and singular every of the
aforesaid one hundred acres with the appurtainances [sic] thereunto belonging
as in anywise appurtaining [sic] to the only use and behoof(?) of the
aforesaid Richard Yielding his heirs and assigns forever and I the said
William Mills for myself my heirs and assigns doth hereby covenant and agree
to and with the aforesaid Richard Yielding that the said William Mills  his
heirs Exrs. and admrs. shall at all times warrant and forever defend the
aforesaid granted premesis to the said Richard Yielding his heirs and assigns
forever against all claims or demands whatsoever whereby the above mentioned
premises might or may be Effected or Incumbered
[sic] contrary to the true Intent and meaning of these presents. In Witness
whereof the said William Mills hath set his hand and seal the day and year
first above written,
William MILLS {Seal}
Testes
Isham TRAVIS
Thomas JUSTICE
Transcribed from copies of originals by Judith Presnell Canant

Milly died in 1811, probably from complications of childbirth, in Rutherford, North Carolina. Her gravesite is unknown.

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

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Monday, December 1, 2014

Archibald McKenzie-Newly found Ancestor #47 of #52Ancestors

This work has been released into the public domain by its author, Apers0n at the English Wikipediaproject. This applies worldwide.

Through the miracle of DNA testing, I've been able to go a bit further back on some of my lines. I was able to connect back to Archibald McKenzie. He was born about 1818, and was christened October 11, 1818 in Macroom, County Cork, Ireland. His parents were Murdock and Sarah McKenzie.

I was really excited to connect back to Archibald. I've never been able to find WHERE in Ireland any of my Irish ancestors came from. Now I've got a place.

I've got lots more investigating to do, but here's what I've learned so far.

Archibald married Elizabeth Brown. They had children as follows:

Murdock Orr McKinzie born 1841 in Ireland, married Mary Frances Sullivan.
Jane McKinzie born Mar 17 1842 in Ireland, married Daniel McNamara.
George Patrick McKenzie born June 3, 1851 in County Cork, married Alice Veronica Butler.
John McKenzie born 1857 Ireland.
William McKenzie (Mackenzie on birth registration) born 1859 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorganshire, Wales, married Jane.
Archibald "Archie" McKenzie (Mckinsey on birth registration) born 1863 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorganshire, Wales.
Henry McKenzie born 1865 in Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania.

Archibald was involved in a riot at Coolderrihy (Coolderry), Cork:

(CE 19/12/1845) - MACROOM PETTY SESSIONS - Archibald M’Kenzie and John Connell were charged with riot and unlawful assemblage at Coolderrihy on the ….. of September. Both prisoners pleaded guilty. - Mr. B. Gallwey, (Crown Solicitor), said he would enter into a few particulars, to show the seriousness of the offence with which the prisoners stood charged. This was a prosecution that resulted out of a very serious riot which occurred at Coolderrihy, in which upwards of four hundred persons were engaged; the prisoners were present, one of whom (M’Kenzie) took a very active part, seizing one of the police man’s muskets and attempting to wrest it from him, and several policemen were severely injured on the occasion. -Constable Parr examined by Mr. Gallwey - Deposed that he was present at Coolderrihy on the day on which the riot occurred; had a prisoner in custody, and was conveying him away when M’Kenzie rushed forward and desired the constable to let go the man; saw him take an active part in the riot generally; about four hundred persons were engaged in the riot; the Rev. James O Driscoll was present; his horse was struck in the eye, which was knocked out; the priest was busily engaged in quelling the disturbance. - Sub-Inspector Gernon examined by Mr. Gallwey - Was at the pattern at Coolderrihy on that day with a party of 30 men; Mr. O Driscoll arrived at the time rioting was proceeding; he exerted himself in the most strenuous manner to induce the people to go home; requested me not to allow my men to load, and he would get the people to disperse; he came back shortly afterwards and told me that his horse had been struck in the eye; no man could have made more active exertions to force the people to go home; understood him to be curate to the parish priest and known to the people; it was the greatest scene of confusion that he ever witnessed. - Mr. Little remarked it certainly was a most disgraceful outrage, and but for the judicious conduct of the officer in command, and the praiseworthy exertions of the Rev. Mr. ODriscoll, most diastrous consequences might have ensued. - The Court agreed with Mr.Little, and thought great praise was due to those gentlemen in so effectually preventing a most serious breach of the peace. - The prisoners were respectively sentenced to 4 months’ imprisonment.


Archibald moved his family to Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorganshire, Wales between 1857 and 1859. They are found there in the 1861 census. The boarder, Daniel McNamara, would marry daughter Jane. 

Archie immigrated to the US about 1863.

The family is found in Beaver Falls, Beaver, Pennsylvania in 1870

The family in 1870. Last name is spelled McKinzie.

Event Place: Pennsylvania, United States
Household Role Gender Age Birthplace
Archie Mckinzie  M 50 Ireland
Elisabeth Mckinzie  F 48 Ireland
John Mckinzie  M 13 Ireland
William Mckinzie  M 10 Wales
Archie Mckinzie  M 7 Wales
Henry Mckinzie  M 4 Pennsylvania

Archibald died at some time after the 1870 census.

The Name McKenzie was also spelled McKinzie by several of his descendants, and varied on birth, census and death records.


If you know any more about this family, I'd love to hear from you!

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Less than #52Ancestors-My DNA Matches #46

I sent off my DNA test to AncestryDNA about a month ago, and have been awaiting the results. They came back yesterday. I was EXCITED (to say the least).

My Ethnicity was no surprise.

My dad's side is Irish-Italian, my mom's is English-German-Irish. I would have thought the Italian would have been more than 16% though.



What I'm really looking for is some link to my roots that I don't have. Scrolling on down the page I found my DNA Circles. This shows the link between me and other AncestryDNA participants through a common ancestor.

Hmmm, one set of grandparents to start, and the rest are singles. I wonder where their spouses are? And all are from my mom's side of the family.

I have one second cousin that I've been in contact with for years. There are 93 others that are fourth to sixth cousins. Of those 94 people, 63 have a tree that I can view..if I pay $49 for the Ancestry Insights subscription. It does let me send a message to those contacts for free. I've tried a few, hopefully I'll hear back soon.

Actually the most interesting leads seem to be in the matches I have that are NOT in the DNA circles. In sifting through those, I see some very interesting links to some brick wall ancestors.

There are at least other things to try. Family Tree DNA lets you import your Ancestry results to their database free. The catch is that I need 2 more people need to transfer with the above link before all my matches are unlocked for free, or I can pay $39. It appears I have about 20 second to fourth cousin matches there. There is pretty much nothing I can do with them until one of those two things happen.

But wait...there's more!
GED Match will also let you upload your Ancestry results free...really free. The website is not as slick looking as the others, but it appears really powerful. I had no problem uploading my DNA or my tree. It took a few days for my DNA is to process, but in viewing matches to other trees, it looks promising. I can use DNA in combination with my family tree to find matches...and contact them free!

My GEDMatch ID is A065731.

I've also joined Wikitree, which is free. They let you link your Ancestry and GEDmatch results. Hopefully I'll get some hits there.

My WikiTree ID is McGowan-470

If you can think of anything else I can do with these results, let me know.

Wish me luck!